All posts by Joe Bissen

About Joe Bissen

Joe Bissen is a Caledonia, Minnesota native and former golf letter-winner at Winona State University. He is a sports copy editor at the St. Paul Pioneer Press and former sports editor of the Duluth News-Tribune. His writing has appeared in Minnesota Golfer and Mpls.St.Paul magazines. He lives in White Bear Lake, MN.  Joe's first book, Fore! Gone. Minnesota's Lost Golf Courses 1897-1999, was released in December 2013. Click here to pre-order now.

Minneapolis Mystery II: Camden Park Golf Club

Here I am, hooked on another lost golf course, all because I took an afternoon hike.

All because I crossed over Shingle Creek …

shinglemouth

… and under the Camden Bridge.

camdenbridge-under

This is North Minneapolis.

“Minneapolis Mystery” was the title of Chapter 29 in my book, “Fore! Gone. Minnesota’s Lost Golf Courses 1897-1999.” It wasn’t set in North Minneapolis but rather a few miles south. The chapter’s crux: trying to unearth the old stomping grounds that was the historic Bryn Mawr Golf Club, 1898-1910. I did it – well, I’m 95 percent certain I did — but it wasn’t easy. Determining the home planets of those who flew the UFOs into Area 51 might have been easier. (For those who want to know more about Bryn Mawr GC, you can A) read my book or B) do the Google and find Minneapolis parks historian David C. Smith’s excellent history of the place.)

Now, presenting Minneapolis Mystery II: Camden Park Golf Club.

In late August, while walking the trails alongside the Mississippi River in North Mississippi Regional Park, I came upon the mouth of Shingle Creek, the point at which it empties into the river. Remembering that I had written about this approximate location in “Fore! Gone.”, with a four-paragraph passage on an almost-unknown course called Camden Park Golf Club, I caught the bug again.

Infernal bug. No known cure. Reafflicted, I decided to try to figure out where Camden Park GC was buried.

NO DENYING IT

Camden Park Golf Club? The North Minneapols locals, even those with  deep knowledge of the area’s history, were mostly skeptical. “You know anything about the golf course that used to be around here?” Quizzical, doubting looks. In one or two instances, you’d think I had asked, “You know anything about the Yeti colony that used to be around here?”

Yes, there was a Camden Park Golf Club in North Minneapolis, in the Camden neighborhood and near the intersection of Lyndale Avenue North and what is now Webber Parkway. Almost no one has heard about it because the club was obscure and almost certainly short-lived, with a life span likely short of a decade.

Four documents — the only ones I’ve found that mention Camden Park Golf Course — confirm its existence:

– From the July 21, 1899, Minneapolis Tribune, by way of Smith’s blog: “The Camden Park golf club has been organized among the young men in the employ of the C. A. Smith Lumber company.” The new club, the newspaper reported, had a membership of 25 and growing. “It plays over a beautiful course of nine holes laid out in the Camden park region and crosses the creek three times,” wrote the Tribune.  David C. Smith presumed (correctly) that the reference was to Shingle Creek.

– This, from the national 1901 Harper’s Golf Guide: “CAMDEN PARK GOLF CLUB – Post-office address, Camden Place, and sub-station, Minneapolis.”

– An almost-identical entry appears in the 1902 “Official Golf Guide” published by The Grafton Press of New York.

– The golf club is mentioned in a 1905 Minneapolis city directory, with a listed address of “Camden Park Place Athletic Club, 4157 Washn Ave N.”

The Harper’s entry is longer and will be fully transcribed later, but the point is, yes, there was a Camden Park Golf Club.

I had speculated in “Fore! Gone.” that the course might have been within a few hundred yards of the Mississippi River, near the current I-94 corridor and the Camden Bridge.

Mea culpa. Sorta. I think I was wrong. After having spent parts of three months revisiting the subject — walking the area, talking with local residents and experts, Googling up a storm, and viewing old plat maps and city directories — I believe I can say this, firmly and unequivocally, about the site of Camden Park Golf Club:

Damned if I know exactly where it was.

Two theories remain in play for me, the only two that make much sense. A third seems less plausible. Follow along, if you can — the writing is out of necessity quite detailed and probably about as enervating as reading John Milton. If it’s a nugget or two about the golf club and its members you want, just go to the bottom of the post.

Here are the cases stated for each theory, using 42nd Avenue and Lyndale Avenue North as a base point:

TO THE EAST

Theory: Camden Park Golf Club was east of Lyndale Avenue, occupying what is now part of the I-94 corridor and the southern edge of the North Mississippi Regional Park grounds. It covered roughly an area west to east from Lyndale nearly to the Mississippi River and south to north from 42nd (if it had extended east of Lyndale) and 44th (ditto) avenues North.

Likelihood: 10 percent.

Why it could have been: The course was, after all, named Camden Park, and this is the plot that would have been closest to Camden Park — the original Camden Park. A little background: at the time Camden Park GC was organized, Camden Park was east of Lyndale Avenue and 42nd Avenue North, not far from the Mississippi River. A new Camden Park was established in 1908, west of Lyndale and north of what was then referred to as Washington Avenue or Crystal Lake Road. That park now goes by the name Webber Park, so renamed in 1939.

The reference in the Harper’s Guide to “sub-station” as part of the location could have been to the Shingle Creek Pumping Station, which essentially abutted the river on ground that now is a parking lot and launch area at the southern terminus of North Mississippi Regional Park.

Also, considering that the course was organized and/or played by employees of the C.A. Smith company, whose massive lumber mill was based at 4400 Lyndale Avenue North, it’s possible the golfing enthusiasts used part of the lumber mill land for their fledgling course.

1898-se
1898 plat map of the area immediately east of 42nd, Lyndale and Washington avenues. Red lines indicate possible approximate borders of Camden Golf Club grounds. (All plat map images used with permission of Hennepin County Library; click on the photos for larger images.)

Why it probably wasn’t: Not enough room. On this plot, the place would have been nicknamed Claustrophobia Country Club. Though the Camden Park course was short by today’s standards, totaling 1,586 yards and with a longest hole of 235 yards, there almost certainly would have been too much neighborly interference to have accommodated even nine short holes here. No room to the west — the Lyndale Hotel (built in 1988, razed in 1912, standing at what is now the foot of the Camden Bridge) was part of a series of buildings and businesses along 42nd, Washington and Lyndale. The course couldn’t have gone far to the southeast because the pumping station was there. Slightly farther south, railroad tracks went as much as four-wide. The course couldn’t have extended farther north than 44th Avenue North because Smith lumber-mill structures were there. Three Shingle Creek crossings in that area is plausible based on the 1898 map, but by 1903 (see map below), Shingle Creek had been moved south and a pond had emerged, with two narrow creek channels leading from it and emptying into the Mississippi River. Most of all, the original Camden Park would have occupied a good share of the golf grounds, and park visitors likely wouldn’t have taken kindly to getting knocked in the noggin by rogue park interlopers playing some newfangled stick-and-ball game.

1903 plat map of the area east of 42nd, Lyndale and Washington

1903 plat map of the area east of 42nd, Lyndale and Washington

Underneath the I-94 bridge that crosses over Shingle Creek. This is not the creek's original path; it used to be farther to the south. This would be close to the grounds of Camden Park Golf Club, if (unlikely) it was east of Lyndale Avenue.

Beneath the I-94 bridge that crosses over Shingle Creek. This is not the creek’s original path; it used to be farther to the south. This would be close to the grounds of Camden Park Golf Club, if (unlikely) it was east of Lyndale Avenue.

TO THE WEST

Theory: The Camden Park Golf Club grounds occupied an area that is now mostly the eastern edge of Webber Park. Golf-course borders would have been just north of what is now Webber Parkway, extending possibly as far north as 44th Avenue North, and possibly almost as far west as Dupont Avenue, if Dupont had extended north of Webber Parkway.  To put it in 2014 terms, think of the area around the Shingle Creek spillway, the Bridge of Dreams and where the Webber Park swimming pool is being built, and you have the likely resting grounds of Camden Park Golf Course.

Webber Park, looking north, near the intersection of Webber Parkway and Bryant Avenue North. The treeline in the background is on the banks of Shingle Creek. Most likely, this is where Camden Park Golf Club once lay.

Webber Park, looking north, near the intersection of Webber Parkway and Bryant Avenue North. The treeline in the background is on the banks of Shingle Creek. Most likely, this is where Camden Park Golf Club once lay.

Likelihood: 80 percent.

Why it could have been: Many reasons. 1) Three Shingle Creek crossings would have been eminently feasible (incidentally, Shingle Creek in 1900 nearly abutted what is now Webber Parkway; it has since been re-routed about 100 yards to the north, up against the railroad tracks). 2) The “sub-station” reference can be explained by the likelihood that it was to the nearby post office outlet and not the pumping house. 3) The area would have been larger than the relative broom closet east of Lyndale, especially if land north of the railroad tracks, now occupied by Republic Services, is included. Plat maps confirm this as a larger plot, big enough to accommodate a small golf course, and show no more than a half-dozen structures in the area in 1898.  The golf course couldn’t have been south of Washington Avenue, at least not more than a few dozen feet south, because there were homes all along the avenue.

1898 plat map of the area west-northwest of 42nd, Lyndale and Washington avenues. The Camden Park Golf Club site? Probably.

1898 plat map of the area west-northwest of 42nd, Lyndale and Washington avenues. The Camden Park Golf Club site? Probably.

The same area in 1903

The same area in 1903.

Camden golfers might have been afforded a nearby check-in station at this site — call it a clubhouse if you wish. The 1901 Harper’s Guide lists club officers, including “Chairman of House Committee, W. H. Trabert, 4247 Washington Avenue, North Minneapolis.” That address, now 4247 Webber Parkway, is directly across the street from the current Webber Park. Trabert lived in the same domicile as one Charles L. Trabert, president of the Camden Park Golf Club and a clerk at the C.A. Smith Lumber Company (1906 Hudson’s Directory of Minneapolis says so). I’m thinking the Traberts might have checked in folks at their house, sent them on their way through the front yard, across Washington Avenue and onto the greensward.

Incidentally, in 1904, according to the Saint Paul Globe newspaper, a W.H. Trabert, a sophomore at the University of Minnesota, was seriously injured duing sophomore-party hijinks and had at least part of his foot amputated. The same W.H. Trabert? 

Why it might not have been: No good reason I can think of. But I can’t exclude other grounds as long-shot possibilities, so I’m not going to unequivocally state that the old Camden Park Golf Club grounds is on the site of the current Webber Park. Still, my reasonably educated guess says it is.

Shingle Creek spillway, near the eastern edge of Webber Park. This feature was built in 1980, long after Camden Park Golf Club closed.

Shingle Creek spillway, near the eastern edge of Webber Park. This feature was built in 1980, long after Camden Park Golf Club closed.

Shingle Creek, looking south, with Webber Park in the background and homes along Webber Parkway farther back. Though the creek ran farther to the south in 1900, this spot still likely was on the former Camden Park Golf Club grounds.
Shingle Creek, looking south, with Webber Park in the background and homes along Webber Parkway farther back. Though the creek ran farther to the south in 1900, this spot still likely was on the former Camden Park Golf Club grounds.

THEORY 3

I’m leaving open a remote possibility the golf course was in an even larger area north of 44th Avenue North and west of Dupont Avenue — but that site was so far removed from Camden Place and Washington Avenue that it seems unlikely.

Likelihood: 10 percent.

1898-farnw

ETC.

– Members of Camden Park Golf Club probably were not the types who pushed and pulled on C.A. Smith’s crosscut saws for 11 hours, then brushed the sawdust off their flannel shirts and walked over for a leisurely (pronounced lezh-er-ly) nine. The club officers were white-collar: Vice president Chester Ellsworth was a lawyer in the Loan & Trust Building, secretary J.O. Wells was a dentist who appears to have boarded with the Traberts on Washington Avenue, and treasurer Carl G. Krook was a lawyer in the New York Life Building (my, that surname was unfortunate).

– Here is full text of the 1901 Harper’s Guide entry, under the heading for Minnesota courses:

CAMDEN PLACE

CAMDEN PARK GOLF CLUB.–Post-office address, Camden Place, and sub-station, Minneapolis. Entrance fee: $15. Annual dues, $1. Membership, 35. A nine-hole course. Distances and bogey figures: 1, 135, 6; 2. 140, 4; 3. 218, 5; 4. 235, 6; 5. 196, 6; 6. 110, 3; 7. 162, 4; 8. 200, 4; 9. 190, 5. President, Charles L. Trabert; Vice-President, Chester Ellsworth; Secretary, Dr. J. O. Wells, Camden Place, Minneapolis; Chairman of House Committee, W. J. Trabert, 4247 Washington Avenue, North Minneapolis; Treasurer, Carl G. Krook. Greenkeeper: Herbert J. Anderson.

– Camden Park GC is not the only lost golf course on Shingle Creek. About 10 miles upstream in Brooklyn Park, near the creek’s northernmost point, Brooklyn Park Golf Course, also known as Joyner’s, hosted golfers from 1962-96 and was bisected by Shingle Creek.

– Heartiest thanks to North Minneapolis folks who lent a hand in my research, including Will Lumpkins and especially including Ron Manger, whose insight into circa-1900 Camden was particularly enlightening. I welcome any corrections, clarifications or further insight.

– Don’t forget to buy my book; you can get it for $19.95 on Amazon.com (buy it through fivestarsales; that’s me). Much of it is a lighter read than this was. I promise.

The eastern edge of Webber Park, at Webber Parkway and Lyndale Avenue, and likely former grounds of Camden Park Golf Club.

The eastern edge of Webber Park, at Webber Parkway and Lyndale Avenue, and likely former grounds of Camden Park Golf Club.

 WHAT’S NEXT?

Well, there is this entry in the 1901 Harper’s Guide:

“LAKE HARRIET GOLF CLUB. Organized, 1900. A nine-hole course.”

There it is. Minneapolis Mystery III.

Don’t get me started. Please.

Art Hennington postscript

2014-09-27 10.54.49
Hats off to Art Hennington, the retired Elk River history teacher who on Thursday presumably became the first person to play all of Minnesota’s golf courses. The “presumably” is included mostly because, A, no one with a similar claim has come forward, as far as I know, and B, we have to presume Hennington is an upstanding fellow who hasn’t played, say, 54 Minnesota courses and meanwhile studied the state’s golf guides in order to sound credible should anyone challenge his claim. (Highly unlikely. Throw the name of a course or town at Hennington, and he’ll likely have at least a couple of nuggets to pass along from his stop there.)

I was fortunate enough to chat with Hennington and his wife, Joni, a couple of hours before he teed off at St. Paul’s Town & Country Club, the 526th course he now has played. My story for the St. Paul Pioneer Press is here (thanks to my editors, who let an embarrassingly long story by newspaper standards run in its entirety): http://bit.ly/1na5SWo

I would be interested in hearing about how many courses the Minnesota golfers out there have played — also favorites, anecdotes, even the “unfavorites” — but keep it classy, please. In the meantime, I’ll pass along a few unpublished notes from my visit with Hennington.

– Although Hennington has played 526 Minnesota courses, he does not — nor should anyone — say there are 526 golf courses in Minnesota. That number is all but impossible to define. Hennington mentioned 519 as the number of golf courses by the Minnesota Golf Association’s count. In addition, there is a small minority of Minnesota courses that are not MGA members, there are courses Hennington played that have since shut down, and there are some establishments that may or may not be real golf courses, sort of like Pluto may or may not be a real planet. Hennington mentioned a visit he made to a piece of land in central Minnesota on which the owner had constructed a “golf course” that featured so-called re-creations of famous sites and battlegrounds, such as Bataan. Hey, whatever floats your military-industrial boat … but Hennington found it difficult to label that one a golf course.

– I asked Hennington about his favorite courses. Based on other stories that have been written about him, he has been reluctant to identify one, but he clearly had a strong attraction to The Wilderness, Jeff Brauer’s gem alongside Lake Vermilion in Tower. He also has said White Bear Yacht Club was a favorite, and after Thursday’s round he was highly complimentary of Town & Country. Also, he was a fan of the former side of one of the state’s love-it-or-hate-it courses: Mississippi Dunes in Cottage Grove. Hennington was impressed. “With six par 5s, six par 4s and six par 3s, there is an interesting dichotomy of holes,” Hennington said. “And diabolical green setups. It’s kind of a hidden gem, although I’m sure a lot of people hate it because it’s so tough.”

– Hennington has a “bottom 10″ list, but in the interest of decorum, I didn’t ask him about it. Though I like to think that everything that calls itself a golf course has some redeeming quality, I can think of a few bottom-10 candidates.

– Hennington did identify a few holes he particularly enjoyed — in addition to the relatively unknown par-4 second at Oak Knolls in Red Lake Falls that’s mentioned in the PP story, he saluted the par-5 18th at the Arthur Hills-designed Chaska Town Course, with water all along the left.

– In addition to the challenge of getting on exclusive country clubs like Spring Hill, Woodhill and Town & Country, Hennington mentioned one other challenge: bridges. “I’m afraid of heights,” he said, “and there’s a couple of courses where you have to walk across suspension bridges, and I had to walk across them real fast with my eyes closed.” Take note, Silver Bay Golf Course — your walkways are not acrophobia-friendly. (No, that’s not a knock on Silver Bay GC. I’ve played it, and it’s a fine North Shore nine-holer.)

– Access to other private country clubs was not as daunting as the aforementioned. “Some of the courses, literally I wrote to and they said, sure, you can come,” Hennington said. “But the real exclusive ones, they weren’t like that.”

– My 20-minute visit with Hennington was too short. I could have listened for hours to his reflections on Minnesota golf. He conceded that what he has done was “a heck of an accomplishment,” and I might state it in even stronger terms. Well done, Art.

The Big Three and the TPC

tpc

The big news coming out of 3M Championship media day Tuesday was the announcement that the “Big Three” of Nicklaus (that’s Jack), Palmer (that’s Arnold) and Player (that’s Gary) would compete in this year’s Greats of Golf competition during 3M Championship week July 28-Aug. 3 at the TPC Twin Cities in Blaine.

My story for the St. Paul Pioneer Press on the announcement can be read here: http://www.twincities.com/sports/ci_25982107/golf-3m-championship-reuniting-arnold-palmer-jack-nicklaus

Surprising news? Somewhat, especially considering the 74-year-old Nicklaus never plays in regular Champions Tour events anymore (hasn’t since 2005) and only rarely plays in exhibitions or charity events (he did play as part of a “Big Three” appearance in this year’s Insperity Championship at The Woodlands, Texas).

But I wouldn’t call the news shocking. Not with Hollis Cavner running the show.

Cavner, the 3M Championship tournament executive director, regularly outdoes himself in terms of landing A-listers. Last year’s coup was adding a women’s team for the Saturday “Greats of Golf” competition, with a pairing of Annika Sorenstam, Nancy Lopez and Pat Bradley captained by Palmer. I followed that pairing for three holes and was floored by the grace and precision of Sorenstam’s swing. Not sure I’ve seen a better one.

Anyway, as for Cavner, I wouldn’t put anything past him. Best guess for next year’s 3M: He’ll land Old Tom Morris.

A couple of leftover nuggets from Tuesday:

– Here is what fans, who incidentally can attend at no charge, will be watching when the Big Three take to the sprawling greens at TPC Twin Cities: a combined 34 major championships and 191 career victories on the PGA and Champions tours. The breakdown: Nicklaus, 18 majors, 73 wins on PGA Tour, 8 on Champions Tour; Palmer, 7 majors, 62 on PGA Tour, 5 on Champions Tour; Player, 9 majors, 24 on PGA Tour, 19 on Champions Tour (he is credited with 163 worldwide victories).

– Defending champion Tom Pernice is having a strong 2014 season. Pernice, 54, won the Principal Charity Classic in Des Moines, Iowa, has four top-10 finishes and ranks eighth on the Champions Tour money list with $591,917.

– Pernice, who was on hand for media day, on the Big Three’s appearance at the 3M Championship and on the TPC Twin Cities course, designed by Palmer and Tom Lehman:

“It’s special for me. I grew up idolizing and watching these guys. I played with them a little bit at the beginning of my career. To have Arnold, Jack and Gary – he’s ageless at age 70 whatever he is (78, to be precise) – it’s going to be exciting.

“… What I like about the golf course is that it has variety. The par 5s have risk and reward to them. You can make eagles; you can make bogeys. … I’m just amazed, with the winter and spring you’ve had not being very good, at how good of condition the golf course is in.

“It’s exciting to me to know that at one time this was a flat piece of land; it’s pretty hard to believe. I like that the water’s in play, but it’s not overly in play. It gives you freedom to play. It’s not scary, but it’s there.

“We’re in the entertainment business; it’s good to have birdies as opposed to bogeys. We’ve all played U.S. Opens, and those are great if you’re trying to find the truest champion, but those aren’t necessarily fun weeks. … That’s their career (PGA Tour players). We’re on the other end of our careers; it’s good for us to come out and enjoy ourselves. To be able to see the greats come out and play on Saturday is a huge deal for us. The players love it; I personally love it; I get to see them, talk to them, say hello to them. It’s pretty special stuff what’s going on here at the 3M Championship.”

Awards season

Two honors so far for “Fore! Gone. Minnesota’s Lost Golf Courses”:
– A bronze medal (bronze-medal tie, to be perfectly accurate), in Mid-West Non-Fiction in the “IPPY” Awards (Independent Publisher Book Awards, with more than 5,500 total entries from 34 countries).
– Selected one of three finalists in the Recreation/sports category in the Midwest Book Awards competition (winners will be announced May 14).
Teamwork can do wonders. I had three terrific colleagues who made this book a winner: designer Tami Dever, photographer Peter Wong and editor Gary Derong. A heartfelt thank you to them, and to all the wonderful people I met who told me about lost golf courses.

Edinburgh USA renovations begin

The grounds were bustling Friday at Edinburgh USA in Brooklyn Park. The driving-range stalls were nearly full, 24 high school boys golf teams were in action in the highly regarded Tri-State Invitational, and even with all that, there was a short stop in progress.

No, not a shortstop. A short stop.

The short stop was mine. I checked in briefly at the pro shop while on, well, business. I’ll get to that later.

More significantly, I was the beneficiary of an update on changes that are coming to Edinburgh USA. The city-owned course, designed by Robert Trent Jones II and opened in 1987, home to an LPGA Tour stop for seven years and the 1992 U.S. Public Links Championship, is about to get a facelift. The backhoes are set to be cranked up Monday morning as work begins on an extensive course renovation. Trees have been and will be removed, much of the course’s sand will be dispensed with, and two greens will be redesigned. Trent Jones II will handle the redesign work as well.

Club pro and golf course manager Don Berry — a week removed from a second-place finish in the Senior PGA Professional Championship that earned him a berth in next month’s Senior PGA Championship — said the changes will have the cumulative effect of making the course easier for medium- and higher-handicap players, though he noted that the course still will be a challenge for better players. (Edinburgh USA measures 6,904 from the back tees and requires an astute hole-by-hole game plan.)

Berry didn’t use the word “playability,” but it’s apparent that increased playability is one aim of the redesign. On Saturday, Berry told ESPN 1500 Golf Show hosts Craig Teiken and Joe Stansberry that 40 percent of the course’s sand will be removed. He had told me the day before that there would be much more grassy and fairway area around the greens than currently exists, so presumably higher-handicap players will be able to play their way onto the greens with more ease, buoyed by the prospect of fewer bunker shots. It seems likely that pace of play will improve as a result.

Berry also told Teiken and Stansberry that work would be done three holes at a time and should be completed by Aug. 1.

Those familiar with the course will notice a difference right away. The first hole (pictured below), a 492-yard par 5 from the middle tees, currently has three bunkers just inside the left rough. The three-bunker configuration will turn into a single bunker with the redesign, and there will be fairway on both sides of the bunker.

edinburgh1

Edinburgh USA’s best-known hole, and one of the best-known in Minnesota, the par-4 17th featuring an “island fairway,” will be one of the least-changed holes with the redesign, Berry said. (Can’t say it’s one of my favorites, but I’m probably just sore because the first time I played it, I double-cross-pull-hooked my tee shot left of all of the water, a feat that likely has never been repeated, wound up with a 30-degree sidehill lie in no-man’s land and shortly penciled in a snowman on the scorecard.)

In a January web posting, Berry wrote this of the prospective changes:

“Edinburgh USA will be starting an extensive golf course renovation in the spring. All the bunkers and surrounding areas will be completely re-done; new sand, new design, new liners and some fairway grass around the bunkers to completely modernize the course. Also, the first and third greens will be re-designed and re-grassed. What this means for the golfer is that some bunkers will be closed during your round and we will have a couple of temporary greens for the first half of the golf season. We feel the wait will be worth it as the golf course will be amazing when completed.”

Edinburgh USA’s website is www.edinburghusa.com.

As for the business I was on, it falls here under the category of shameless self-promotion. If you stop by the Edinburgh USA pro shop, you can not only view detailed, hole-by-hole sketches of the redesign work, you can pick up for $19.95 a copy of my book, “Fore! Gone. Minnesota’s Lost Golf Courses 1897-1999.” Makes for a great Father’s Day or Mother’s Day gift. (Full disclosure: If you look to the right on this web page, you’ll see that Berry pre-read the book before publication and offered a short review.)